By Sarah Walsh, Glamour Sensations Guest Editor

When I first started up modeling back in 2012, I thought like every other girl getting into the business: the more gigs I get, the more money I’ll make.  At the time it’s the only thing that made sense.  So here I was – 23 years old, armed with a handful of decent pictures in my portfolio, a few sexy outfits, and the ambition to be rich.  Actually, I wasn’t expect to get rich, but I was hoping to make enough money to be able to cut my hours down at work a little.  If I made $500/week, I would have been thrilled.  And believe it or not, very quickly I was making that and then some each and every week.  I was busting it though!  Through my Model Mayhem profile, I was getting at least two or three “legit” offers a day.  And by “legit”, I mean they were offers from people in the Chicago area that were interested in photographing me in only up to topless (not porn offers), and willing to pay.  Sounds good, huh?  Well here’s how it all went down…

So the first couple weeks were good.  I was driving anywhere up to an hour to meet with various photographers (actually GWC’s – learn about them here) at primarily hotel rooms, but also a house, and one Sybaris.  Yes, in case you’re wondering, it was a bit scary, but I at least understood enough at the time that this was the nature of the beast.  If you are afraid to meet people at locations like these (I did by myself), then you probably aren’t going to last very long because even when you “go pro”, you’re still going to have to meet people one-on-one in obscure locations.  Anyway, in exchange for about three hours of my time, and posing in various skimpy outfits and showing off my chest (C cups in case you’re wondering), I typically walked away with $300 – $400 a trip.  Not bad, huh?  Well it’s not bad if you’re comfortable with some guy you have never met before taking pictures of you while you’re practically naked and trying to look sexy.  It’s not glamorous, nor is it sexy (at least for me it wasn’t), but it was easy if you can get over yourself.  And don’t get me wrong, there were a couple of nice guys in the mix.  In fact, there was one that I probably would have dated had it not been the fact that he was married.  But that’s another story for another day…

Ok, so the first few weeks went well and I was meeting or exceeding my $500/week goal.  But then shit started happening.  By “shit” I mean creeps and scammers started appearing, cancellations began occurring, and the not-so-glamorous lifestyle of glamour modeling began to wear me down.  And yes, I was only a few weeks into it.

So what happened to me, and what happens to just about every other model at this point?

For starters, this business is going to attract creeps. And by the way – ladies, if you can’t deal with a creepy guy with a camera (see article here on GWC’s), then you shouldn’t be modeling.  But what also happens is there’s only so many “nice” guys that are willing to pay a virtually unknown girl hundreds of dollars to flash her boobies to his camera. Eventually (in my case after a few weeks), you reach a point of dwindling returns. The “legit” offers I was feasting on stopped coming in as fast.  Sure, there was the occasional guy from California visiting who had some time to fit in a couple more shoots, and there was the occasional guy that just stumbled across my profile and liked what he saw, but by and large the prosperity I experienced early on went away – at least the reliability of it went away.  It just wasn’t reliable anymore.

And yes, the life wasn’t glamorous. I wasn’t rich, I wasn’t being fawned over by fans, or hunted down at the local coffee shop by paparazzi.  Instead, I was just the same girl hustling for money like anyone else.  Nobody knew of me outside the tiny little circle at Model Mayhem.  The photographers I shot with had very small followings, so it’s not like my exposure to their audience really did anything.  In fact, most of them just posted my pictures on their Facebook pages because they didn’t even have websites, and all that really resulted in were some nice comments and a few more friend requests.

In case you’re not catching my drift yet, the glamorous life of a glamour model wasn’t happening for me, and the more I talked to other models”, the more I realized it wasn’t happening for them either.  I also began realizing that we had the exact same issues in common.  Some girls made it two weeks before hitting their breaking point, while others made it four and five weeks, but eventually we all hit the same point.  And the reason for this, as I learned, was because we were all doing it wrong…

To Be Continued in Part 2